Workshop Titles and Descriptions

More Than 100 Workshops Over 3 Days

Sunday, October 22, 2017

  • Pre-Conference Workshops | 11:00 am–4:00 pm

    PC-1 — Featured
    Using Mentor Authors and Illustrators in the Teaching of Writing Workshop; Not Mentor Texts… Because the Text Didn’t Write Itself! (Grades K-2)
    Lisa Cleaveland, Kindergarten Teacher/Author, Jonathan Valley Elementary, NC
    When primary teachers invite young children to make books with pictures and words (Ray and Cleaveland, 2004), they engage them in the same kind of compositional work all authors and illustrators use to make books. And because the work is the same, mentorship has a place to thrive in writing workshops where children make books. How does this happen? From the cover, to the title page, to the dedication, and all the way through a picture book, authors and illustrators have made composition decisions from which children can learn. The key is to know what to talk about in a book and how to talk about it so that this talk supports children as beginning authors and illustrators. This session will include video and student work samples as one teacher shares the different ways she helps authors and illustrators become real mentors for beginning writers. Warning… get ready, this will change your teaching!

    PC-2 — Featured
    Guided Reading Levels N-Z: Using The Fountas & Pinnell Literacy Continuum for Planning and Reflection (Grades 3-8)

    Irene Fountas, Author/Director, Center for Reading Recovery and Literacy Collaborative, Lesley University, MA
    Gay Su Pinnell, Author/Professor Emerita, The Ohio State University, OH

    All students need to develop at least the competencies appropriate for the grade level across every year of schooling until they evidence the competencies of proficient readers at Level Z. Learn how to think about planning effective guided reading lessons for students reading levels N-Z. We will address, through two case examples, the analysis of text characteristics, how to shape the introduction, support readers during reading, facilitate a discussion that deepens understanding, select teaching points to expand the readers’ competencies and provide word work that develops flexibility. We will also put guided reading in the broader context of literacy instruction with intermediate and middle level readers.

    Required Text: The Fountas & Pinnell Literacy Continuum: A Tool for Assessment, Planning, and Teaching, PreK-8 (any edition, Heinemann).

    PC-3 — Featured
    Balancing Independent Reading, Book Clubs, and Core Texts to Engage All Readers (Grades 3-8)

    Penny Kittle, English Teacher, Conway School District, NH
    Explore ways to engage adolescent readers in books that will engage their hearts. Study the practices that help all students develop an independent reading habit to increase stamina and joy in independent reading, leading to increased engagement in challenging, complex texts. We will look at ways to balance the curriculum, increase the effectiveness of reading conferences, and lead students to thoughtful discussions of books they read in small groups and as a class. Learn how to build a classroom and school culture focused on the love of reading.

    PC-4
    Inquiry-Based Reading Mini-Lessons In the Primary Grades (Grades K-2)

    Kerry Crosby, Adjunct Faculty/ Literacy Consultant, Lesley University, MA/Heinemann, NH
    Kristine Haveles-Pelletier, District Literacy Implementation Specialist, K-5, Manchester Public School District, NH

    The session will begin with a focus on interactive read aloud and shared reading as the backbone for using mentor texts in reading minilessons. You will then have the opportunity to observe how teachers use mentor texts and inquiry in reading minilessons to teach for specific reading behaviors in the primary grades. At the end of the session, you will be given time to plan your own minilessons using The Fountas & Pinnell Literacy Continuum as a resource.

    Required Text: The Fountas & Pinnell Literacy Continuum: A Tool for Assessment, Planning, and Teaching, PreK-8 (any edition, Heinemann).

    Reading Recovery Pre-Conference Workshops | 11:00 am–4:00 pm

    PC-5 — Featured
    Oral Language Development and Literacy Learning: Supporting Teachers to Scaffold Students

    Adria Klein, Reading Recovery Trainer, Saint Mary's College of California, CA
    Vygotsky’s concept that language reflects thought leads us to understand the impact of language on literacy development. This pre-conference session will provide a brief overview of the foundational importance of oral language, identify teaching that fosters oral language and literacy development, and discuss support for teachers in understanding the reciprocity between oral language and reading and writing.

    PC-6 — Featured
    Building “Islands of Certainty”: The Importance of Reading and Writing Vocabularies

    James R. Schnug, Reading Recovery Trainer, The Ohio State University, OH
    Marie Clay says that the child will increasingly monitor and use visual information as he learns to read and write words in continuous text. This interactive session will focus on supporting, tracking, and using a child’s emerging vocabularies so that he will strategically integrate visual information in his reading and writing.

    Required Text: Literacy Lessons Designed for Individuals, Second Edition (2016, Heinemann).

Monday, October 23, 2017

  • Session A | 8:30 am–10:00 am

    Keynote Session
    Teaching Practices and Instructional Strategies That Position Students Closer to Reading and Writing Excellence (Grades K-8)Kelly Gallagher, Author, CA
    How do we decide what and what not to teach? With increased expectations and so little time to meet them, we might heed the words of Rock and Roll Hall of Famer, Bob Seger, who asks us to carefully consider our "deadlines and commitments—what to leave in, what to leave out." In this keynote, Kelly will discuss critical decisions that underpin artful teaching, and how these decisions help to move young readers and writers closer to excellence.

  • Session B | 10:30 am–12:00 pm

    LCB-1 — Featured
    Personal Inquiry and Online Research: Connecting Learners In Ways That Matter (Grades 1-8)

    Julie Coiro, Associate Professor, Reading, University of Rhode Island, RI
    Designing interest-driven digital learning opportunities in an age of accountability can be challenging. A Personal Digital Inquiry (PDI) Framework helps plan for students to actively inquire, collaborate, participate, and reflect while staying actively engaged and motivated in their learning community. View examples of what PDI teaching and learning can look like in Grades 1-8 and discuss how to make purposeful choices about levels of support and digital tool use as part of project-based student inquiry. Then, talk with others about how to begin building a culture of inquiry in your classroom.

    LCB-2 — Featured
    Let’s Get Practical: How to Plan for Guided Reading Lessons with Efficiency (Grades K-8)

    Irene Fountas, Author/Director, Center for Reading Recovery and Literacy Collaborative, Lesley University, MA
    Gay Su Pinnell, Author/Professor Emerita, The Ohio State University, OH

    Guided reading is a highly effective instructional approach for all students. You can form small groups and guide the learning of each student to build independent competencies. If planning for several groups a day is overwhelming, you will learn how to take small steps to increase your facility, and you will learn how to get more efficient with your time spent planning.

    LCB-3 — Featured
    Building Deeper Readers and Writers (Grades 3-8)

    Kelly Gallagher, Author, CA
    This session will focus on the key components essential to building young readers and writers: volume, modeling, choice, and conferring. Kelly will share numerous strategies proven to elevate student reading and writing.

    LCB-4 — Featured
    Teaching 7 Essential Nonfiction Craft Tools through Mentor Texts (Grades 2-6)

    Georgia Heard, Author/Independent Consultant, FL
    This session will breathe life into your teaching of nonfiction as Georgia shares 7 essential craft tools that all nonfiction writers need to know to write engaging nonfiction. Each of the 7 craft tools is supported by examples of quality mentor texts.

    LCB-5 — Featured
    Choice Reading: Tools for Building Content Knowledge (Grades K-2)

    Susan Kempton, Teacher/Author/Consultant, Wonder, Discover, Feel Educational Consulting, CO
    Children are naturally drawn to books that captivate them: sharks, dinosaurs, insects…anything in the natural world is a topic for fascination in the young child. Discover how twenty minutes of the day can deepen content knowledge, develop language, and strengthen reading comprehension. In this interactive session you will experience: how to enter into inquiry with children; open windows into their thinking and passion; inform next steps in instruction for concept and language development; and, the various, dynamic tools (e.g. movement, dramatization, song, video) used for building language and concepts for retention and understanding.

    LCB-6 — Featured
    Writing About Research (Grades 5-8)

    Penny Kittle, English Teacher, Conway School District, NH
    Help students learn to write next to complex charts, tables, and graphs in order to advance their arguments or develop their ideas in extended research. We will explore ways to use current events to engage students in increasingly complex writing and revising, helping them summarize positions and counter or extend them by adding their voice to the conversation. We can purposefully teach students to write into an academic conversation of many voices with increased confidence. We will consider the balance of student conferences and other formative measures, final writing products, and student portfolios in increasing our understanding of the needs of our students.

    LCB-7 — Featured
    Windows, Mirrors and an Extra Adjective (Grades K-8)

    Grace Lin, Author/Illustrator, MA
    When we talk about diverse books, we often talk about "windows and mirrors." But what does that mean? And why is it important? In this extended presentation of Grace's TEDx talk, she shares childhood anecdotes and her path to publication, including how she learned to embrace the “multicultural” adjective.

    LCB-8 — Featured
    Writing About Reading (Grades 4-8)

    Kate Roberts, Consultant, Author/Speaker, NY
    Writing about our reading is essential to our literacy work if we hope to see student growth, increase independence, and teach responsively. In this session, Kate will reflect upon current practices of writing about texts and will offer a myriad of ways to help students get to the heart of why writing about reading matters. Participants will practice their own writing about reading skills, and will walk away with many lessons to support the work.

    LCB-9 — Featured
    Spark the Reading-Writing Connection (Grades K-2)

    Maria Walther, Grade 1 Teacher, Gwendolyn Brooks Elementary School, Aurora, IL
    Are you struggling to fit everything in your busy teaching day? Join Maria as she shares her latest classroom-tested ideas for streamlining literacy instruction and teaching with more depth. Learn how to integrate standards-focused big ideas during your reading and writing workshops. You will leave this session with a wealth of picture book titles, lessons, and practical strategies to use in your primary-grade classroom.

    LCB-10 — Featured
    Confer with Confidence (Grades K-2)

    Kari Yates, Program Manager for Literacy/Author/Consultant, Moorhead Public Schools, ND
    Conferring is the heart and soul of reader-centered instruction, but, it can sometimes feel tricky. What to say? What to compliment? What to teach? What to record? It can be overwhelming when we believe we have to get everything "just right" to get going. What if, instead, we simply began by daring to confer imperfectly? Come and explore the thinking shifts and teacher moves that will help you confer with greater confidence and joy starting immediately.

    LCB-11
    The Fairness Timeline: Teaching Social Justice & Civil Rights Through Literature (Grades K-6)

    Amanda L. Bock, Library Teacher, Newton Public Schools, MA
    Elizabeth Ross, Grade 2 Teacher, Newton Public Schools, MA

    The Fairness Timeline consists of historical events that led to greater equality for all. Included are achievements by Phillis Wheatley (1775), Amelia Bloomer (1851), Abraham Lincoln (1863), Jane Addams (1889), Jackie Robinson (1947), Richard & Mildred Loving (1968), Barack Obama (2009) and more. Events are explained using nonfiction picture books, with additional titles for further exploration. You will hear how teachers have used the Timeline in classrooms and explore the included books.

    LCB-12
    How Literacy Coaches Can Support Beginning Teachers (Grades PreK-8)

    Jodi Clark, K-8 Literacy Coach/Induction Specialist, Portsmouth School Department, RI
    Literacy Coaches are faced with the challenge of providing support to beginning teachers in the field that have unique experiences and insights. The dissertation research shared in this session came from interviews with beginning teachers involved in the Rhode Island Induction Program. Nine beginning teachers tell the lived experience of their first year(s) teaching, working with an Induction Coach. You will have a variety of case studies to choose from for a brief study into how a Literacy Coach can provide support. The purpose of this session is to better understand the needs of beginning teachers through stories.

    LCB-13
    First Comes Order, Then Comes Learning (Grades 5-8)

    Brenda Prestage, Educational Consultant, TX
    Literacy can only happen when students have the structure of a well-managed classroom. This session will present strategies that can immediately be implemented in any classroom to make learning more efficient for every student; strategies that help teachers optimize their instructional time by controlling off-task and distracting behavior; strategies that teach students exactly what behavior expectations are; strategies that help teachers maintain composure when students push their buttons. Learning will occur when order is created and maintained by a well-prepared educator.

    LCB-14
    The Power, Promise and Purpose of the Reading Conference (Grades 3-6)

    Jennifer Scoggin, Director, LitLife, Inc., CT
    Hannah Schneewind, Consultant, LitLife, Inc., CT

    This session will encourage you to reconsider the all-important work of conferring, emphasizing the critical need to engage students more fully in their reading lives. The presenters will weave together current research on student motivation, student engagement, best instructional practice and effective feedback, as well as present a new framework for conferring, the Cycle of Conferring Intentions (CCI). You will analyze conference transcripts, reflect on their own practice and leave with a toolkit of resources.

    LCB-15
    The Power of Names (Grades PreK-K)

    Cindy Downend, Primary Literacy Collaborative Trainer, Lesley University, MA
    There is nothing more important or familiar to young children than their own names. Incorporating names into word study makes the process active, personal, and fun from the start. In this session you will explore the multitude of ways that teachers can harness the power of names in order to use them as a resource for teaching children about how letters and words work. PreK and Kindergarten teachers will leave the session with ideas for how to make early learning more effective and more meaningful by incorporating children’s names into shared reading, interactive writing, and independent literacy work.

    LCB-16
    How We Created an RTI Structure for Social-Emotional Needs (Grades K-2)

    Marc J. Smith, Principal, Sandwich Public Schools, MA
    As a newly formed PreK-2 School of 650 students, we quickly realized that we needed a more proactive approach to supporting students in their social and emotional learning and growth. Successful literacy and numeracy development requires that students also grow socially and emotionally. Let us share with you the steps we took as school leaders to provide a multi-tiered system of support for social-emotional growth, the lessons we developed and our plans for the future.

    LCB-17
    Animated Learning with Stop Motion (Grades PreK-8)

    Lindsay Tosches, 5th Grade STEAM teacher and Makerspace Coordinator, Somerville Public Schools/Lelsey University, MA
    Sue Cusack, Assistant Professor/Director of Makerspace, Lesley University, MA
    Jacy Edelman, Project Coordinator, Makerspace, Lesley University, MA
    Matthew Burch, 5th Grade STEAM Teacher and Makerspace Coordinator, Somerville Public Schools/Lesley University, MA

    Stop motion animation is an exciting way to amplify engagement and help your students bring their literacy skills to life. Whether as a vehicle for narrative, informational or persuasive writing, stop motion offers students a unique and highly interactive modality for writing and communication. Join us in this hands-on session as we guide you through the steps to engage your learners using basic art supplies and an iPad or Android tablet.

    LCB-18
    Visual and Verbal Literacy with The Whole Book Approach (Grades K-2)

    Courtney Waring, Director of Education, The Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art, MA
    Discover the difference between reading with children and reading to children. This session introduces you to The Whole Book Approach, a storytime approach designed to give educators the tools to evaluate picture books as an art form and to encourage the critical engagement of students during picture book reading experiences. You will learn more about the beginnings of The Whole Book Approach, then break up into smaller groups to explore the various elements of picture book design.

  • Reading Recovery Session B | 10:30 am–12:00 pm

    RRB-1 — Featured
    Teaching for Strategic Activity, from Roaming Around the Known to Discontinuing

    Julia Douetil, Retired Director, International Literacy Centre, University College London
    What do we need to understand about strategic activity to enable struggling readers to develop a wide range of mental processing activities which they can apply flexibly as they meet new challenges? This session will explore changes in strategic activity as the challenges of text reading and text writing develop, and the implications for teaching.

    Required Text: Literacy Lessons Designed for Individuals, Second Edition (2016, Heinemann).

    RRB-2 — Featured
    Powerful Language Interactions in Reading Recovery Lessons: Developing Strong Literacy Processing Systems

    Eva Konstantellou, Reading Recovery Trainer, Lesley University, MA
    Clay advises that “conversations in the lesson should be warm and friendly but when the child must attend to something, or must pull several things together, the prompt should be clear and crisp” (Literacy Lessons Designed for Individuals, 2016, p. 38). In this session, you will examine select examples from Reading Recovery lessons (using transcripts and video clips) that illustrate how both kinds of language interactions—warm and friendly conversations and the crisp and precise language of prompts—support children’s attempts at extending their control over language and their ability to construct and derive meaning from texts.

    Required Text: Literacy Lessons Designed for Individuals, Second Edition (2016, Heinemann).

    RRB-3 — Featured
    Visual Processing in Phrased Reading

    James R. Schnug, Reading Recovery Trainer, The Ohio State University, OH
    Teaching a child to phrase only through his ears doesn’t value his eyes. This session will challenge your conception of phrasing while practicing procedures that promote accelerative visual processing.

    Required Text: Literacy Lessons Designed for Individuals, Second Edition (2016, Heinemann).

  • Session C | 1:30 pm–3:00 pm

    LCC-1 — Featured
    Writing Right from the Start: Starting a Workshop on Day One (Grades K-2)

    Lisa Cleaveland, Kindergarten Teacher/Author, Jonathan Valley Elementary, NC
    Since there are no developmental prerequisites for book-making, writing workshop can begin on the first day of school. Using both video and photographs showing the first day of writing workshop in a kindergarten classroom, this session will highlight the key instructional decisions one teacher made in launching her students into the work of writing workshop on the first day of school.

    LCC-2 — Featured
    You Can't Read Charlotte's Web If You've Never Seen a Farm: Bringing children out into the world and bringing the world back into the classroom (Grades PreK-2)

    Renee Dinnerstein, Early Childhood Literacy Consultant, NY
    Children involved in meaningful inquiry projects widen the scope of what they can hold onto when they are entering the literary world. The more true experiences they have, the greater their field of knowledge. During this session, you will have the opportunity to do some preliminary planning for a project that would be relevant for their students.

    LCC-3 — Featured
    Building Deeper Readers and Writers (Grades 3-8) (Repeat)

    Kelly Gallagher, Author, CA
    This workshop will focus on the key components essential to building young readers and writers: volume, modeling, choice, and conferring. Kelly will share numerous strategies proven to elevate student reading and writing.

    LCC-4 — Featured
    Heart Maps: Helping Students Create and Craft Authentic Writing (Grades K-6)

    Georgia Heard, Author/Independent Consultant, FL
    If we want students to write well, we must provide opportunities to explore their passions and find significance in their writing. In this session, Georgia will introduce her unique heart map method that will open your students’ hearts, help them discover their stories, and bring their passions to the page.

    LCC-5 — Featured
    Writing About Research (Grades 5-8) (Repeat)

    Penny Kittle, Teacher, Conway School District, NH
    Help students learn to write next to complex charts, tables, and graphs in order to advance their arguments or develop their ideas in extended research. We will explore ways to use current events to engage students in increasingly complex writing and revising, helping them summarize positions and counter or extend them by adding their voice to the conversation. We can purposefully teach students to write into an academic conversation of many voices with increased confidence. We will consider the balance of student conferences and other formative measures, final writing products, and student portfolios in increasing our understanding of the needs of our students.

    LCC-6 — Featured
    Putting a Book to Work (Grades K-8)

    Grace Lin, Author/Illustrator, MA
    We often hear that "diverse" books just don't get taken out, that kids don't gravitate towards them. If we take this as true, how do we change that? Grace shows ways you can encourage kids to pick up a book that might not be an obvious mirror and open the door for reading diversely.

    LCC-7 — Featured
    Falling in Love with Close Reading (Grades 3-8)

    Kate Roberts, Consultant, Author/Speaker, NY
    Close reading is a hot topic these days, sometimes pitched as an answer to our literacy woes. And yet as we continue to fold this practice into our work, it's important to reflect on how we are helping students to become more powerful close readers independent of any teacher, test, or text-dependent questions. In this session, Kate will outline a structure and a few lessons that can help to spark engagement and increase proficiency when you ask students to close read a text.

    LCC-8 — Featured
    Assess, Decide, and Guide: The Keys to Helping ALL Readers Succeed (Grades K-5)

    Maria Walther, Grade 1 Teacher, Gwendolyn Brooks Elementary School, Aurora, IL
    To help students become thoughtful, independent readers, it's essential to know students' specific learning needs and surround them with targeted reading support. Join Maria as she shares a powerful instructional framework and practical tips for using data to make informed decisions and guide readers. Learn how to differentiate reading lessons to match students’ stages of reading development and meet the needs of individual readers by pinpointing a teaching focus, carefully matching readers with texts, strategically prompting, and providing ample time for comprehension conversations. You’ll leave with a wealth of easy-to-implement strategies to transform your reading instruction!

    LCC-9
    Using Facilitative Talk to Deepen Teacher Engagement in Professional Learning (Grades K-8)

    Toni Czekanski, Asst. Dir. Grants, Contracts, and Special Projects, Lesley University, MA
    Helen Sisk, Intermediate and Middle School Literacy Collaborative Faculty, Lesley University, MA

    How do you ensure that educators get the most out of professional learning experiences? Whether it is one-to-one conversations, small group discussions, or whole-group reflection, we want professional learning to pack a punch. The structure of learning opportunities and the way teachers are engaged extends thinking and builds agency and ownership. In this workshop, you will learn what makes professional development effective, how to notice and reflect upon the group’s engagement, and ways to deepen their thinking. This facilitation develops a culture of inquiry and learning and models a reflective process that teachers can use on their own.

    LCC-10
    Mapping Your Instructional Destination with Data (Grades K-2)

    Kevin Depin, Principal, Dennis Yarmouth Regional School District, MA
    Meredith Langelier, Literacy Coach, Dennis Yarmouth Regional School District, MA
    Sharon Howard, Consulting Teacher of Reading, Dennis Yarmouth Regional School District, MA

    Together, we work diligently collecting data, inputting data and organizing it in a way to help teachers and interventionists determine what level of instruction is best for each child in our school. The data guides our level of intervention for each student and helps to determine which method of intervention can be most beneficial for students. We revisit the methods of intervention every 8 weeks (based on data) and help teachers decide whether to continue the current method of intervention or to change or try a new approach. In this session, we will share the timeline that we have been using to collect data, the documents that we use to collect input from teachers, and the guidelines we use to determine how best to support each individual student.

    LCC-11
    New Principals: Best Practices in Culturally Proficient Literacy Coaching (Grades PreK-8)

    Maryann Hasso, High School Teacher, Victor Valley Union High School District, CA
    In an effort to address the various needs of a culturally diverse educational setting, principals will learn instructional strategies that support teachers. These include how to deliver bilingual instruction, reading lessons, instructional time for choosing literature, professional development, writing pedagogy, utilizing various visuals, and culturally responsive instruction that builds on the ethnic foundation of all learners. The results of this presentation will benefit principals in supporting teachers to focus on their culturally diverse student bodies.

    LCC-12
    Leading With Meaning: Planning Book Introductions That Support Thinking (Grades K-2)

    Chrisie Moritz, Literacy Collaborative Coach, Fairfax County Public Schools, VA
    When we lead with meaning in guided reading book introductions, we set students up to actively construct and expand understandings before, during, and after their reading. Planning effective introductions requires being responsive to students’ interests, strengths, and needs, in relation to the supports and challenges texts provide. In this interactive session, you will explore habits of mind for analyzing texts and planning for meaning-driven introductions and discussions with students.

    LCC-13
    Big Ideas in Small Groups (Grades 3-6)

    Michael Rafferty, Instructor, Southern Connecticut State University, CT
    Don't get stuck in your own small group. Teachers in Grades 3-6 will learn how to build lessons that are about big ideas, lessons that release teachers to juggle small groups, conferring and partnerships. Attendees will learn the power of setting and designing more powerful small groups.

    LCC-14
    Building Teacher Expertise Through Data Analysis (Grades PreK-8)

    Alesa Smith, Primary Literacy Coach, Dalton Public Schools, GA
    Jason Brock, Principal, Dalton Public Schools, GA
    Lauren Belonzi, Intermediate Literacy Coach, Dalton Public Schools, GA

    This session is designed for Literacy Coaches and School Administrators who want to learn about a school-wide data protocol. You will hear the story of one school's journey to build community and teacher expertise through a focus on student achievement. Protocols, artifacts, and data will be shared.

    LCC-15
    The Nonfiction Triumvirate: Categories, Structure, and Style (Grades 3-6)

    Melissa Stewart, Children's Book Author, MA
    Today's nonfiction is more creative than ever before. Discover how understanding and experimenting with nonfiction categories, writing styles, and text structures can help authors of all ages make their writing more engaging. There will be a handout with mentor texts.

    LCC-16
    Empower Early Childhood and English Learner Students through Oral Language; Speaking and Listening (Grades K-2)

    Vincent Ventura, Director, LitLife Latin America, TX
    Before reading, before writing: there was oral language. Do you believe that oral language is the foundation of literacy and supports reading and writing? If so, join us! Explore best practices of developing oral language skills in early childhood and English learner classrooms. Develop a deeper understanding on the shift of using precise and targeted teacher talk with explicit and extended student talk. Discover a repertoire of practical oral language strategies and understand its connection to reading, writing and vocabulary acquisition. Be sure to bring your mobile device!

  • Reading Recovery Session C | 1:30 pm–3:00 pm

    RRC-1 — Featured
    Teaching for Strategic Activity, from Roaming Around the Known to Discontinuing (Repeat)

    Julia Douetil, Retired Director, International Literacy Centre, University College London
    What do we need to understand about strategic activity to enable struggling readers to develop a wide range of mental processing activities which they can apply flexibly as they meet new challenges? This session will explore changes in strategic activity as the challenge of text reading and text writing develop, and the implications for teaching.

    Required Text: Literacy Lessons Designed for Individuals, Second Edition (2016, Heinemann).

    RRC-2 — Featured
    Reading Recovery and Expectations for Classroom Writing in First Grade

    Adria Klein, Reading Recovery Trainer, Saint Mary's College of California, CA
    The new standards set the expectation for students to write using evidence from literary and informational texts. In this session, you will explore links between writing in Reading Recovery and the first grade classroom.

    RRC-3 — Featured
    Visual Processing in Phrased Reading (Repeat)

    James R. Schnug, Reading Recovery Trainer, The Ohio State University, OH
    Teaching a child to phrase only through his ears doesn’t value his eyes. This session will challenge one’s conception of phrasing while practicing procedures that promote accelerative visual processing.

    Required Text: Literacy Lessons Designed for Individuals, Second Edition (2016, Heinemann).

  • Session C In-Depth | 1:30 pm–4:45 pm

    LCC-17 In-Depth — Featured
    Using The Online Inquiry Tool To Scaffold Argumentation, Deliberation, and Close Reading (Grades 5-8)

    Julie Coiro, Associate Professor, Reading, University of Rhode Island, RI
    In this hands-on workshop, you will explore a newly developed digital tool designed to support students’ ability to locate, evaluate, and integrate information as they explore multiple sources on the Internet and build consensus on appropriate solutions to issues having more than one point of view. Time will be set aside to use this free online tool, consider examples of how to pair the tool with instructional practices that support students in upper elementary and middle school, and discuss how it might be used to promote writing and reading practices aligned with the Common Core State Standards.

    Required Materials: Please bring a laptop to access the online tool during the session.

  • Session D | 3:30 pm–5:00 pm

    LCD-1 — Featured
    Wait, Did You Say Editing Can Be FUN?! (Grades 3-6)

    Paula Bourque, Literacy Coach/Author, Augusta Schools/Stenhouse, ME
    Participants will learn techniques for engaging writers to edit their work at multiple points in the writing process and not just at “The End”. The goal is for students to become ‘Close Writers’ and read their work for a variety of purposes and with a variety of lenses. Paula will share video and samples from classrooms where students engage in close writing/editing strategies. Paula will also share why editing is often hard for our students and how we can overcome some of those challenges together.

    LCD-2 — Featured
    Writing Right from the Start: Starting a Workshop on Day One (Grades K-2) (Repeat)

    Lisa Cleaveland, Kindergarten Teacher/Author, Jonathan Valley Elementary, NC
    Since there are no developmental prerequisites for book-making, writing workshop can begin on the first day of school. Using both video and photographs showing the first day of writing workshop in a kindergarten classroom, this session will highlight the key instructional decisions one teacher made in launching her students into the work of writing workshop on the first day of school.

    LCD-3 — Featured
    Cultivating Classrooms of Truly Independent Readers (Grades K-8)

    Gravity Goldberg, Author/Consultant, NY
    Assigning independent reading and helping students become independent readers are not the same thing. In this session we clarify what gets in the way of true student independence and what you can do to help students develop autonomy, ownership and confidence as readers. Gravity will explain the 4 roles we can take on as reading teachers— Miner, Mirror, Model, and Mentor. These roles shift students from being compliant readers to readers who are highly engaged and self-directed. You will learn concrete moves that motivate student readers of all ages, while instilling a growth mindset and belief that their hard work does pay off. You will leave this session with knowledge of the mindsets and moves that cultivate highly independent readers.

    LCD-4 — Featured
    Understanding Writing Conferences (Grades K-2)

    Martha Horn, Elementary Education Professor, Rhode Island College, RI
    This session will look at what makes conferring challenging. Why do some conferences seem effective and others, not? Specifically, you will examine the instructional moves of thinking on your feet, drawing the story out, connecting with writers to help them move forward, and considering our language—what helps and what might hinder.

    LCD-5 — Featured
    Song, Movement, Dramatization: Alternative Contexts for Teaching Literacy (Grades PreK-2)

    Susan Kempton, Teacher/Author/Consultant, Wonder, Discover, Feel Educational Consulting, CO
    Young children are captivated by song, movement, and dramatization. Learn how to capitalize on these powerful contexts to harness beginning minds and teach/reinforce concepts of literacy such as phonological awareness, concepts of print, fluency, and develop language in a fun, developmentally appropriate way. In this interactive session expect to dance, sing, move, dramatize and learn like the little learners you teach.

    LCD-6 — Featured
    DIY Literacy: Creating and Using Teaching Tools to Help Students (Happily) Hold On to Teaching and Work to Their Fullest (Grades 3-8)

    Kate Roberts, Consultant/Author/Speaker, NY
    Chances are, you are working harder than ever before. Your units are chock-full of powerful lessons that push kids to higher and higher standards of learning. Often our students encounter all of this teaching without always knowing how to hold on to and use it over time. In this session, Kate will introduce a few powerful tools to help students recall and use what has been taught, push themselves to work harder and more effectively, and to find themselves within a packed curriculum. Of course, tools are only as good as the level to which they are used, so Kate will also demonstrate some impactful ways to introduce and use these tools in our everyday work. You should expect to walk away with a variety of tools to help solve some of the most pernicious problems we face when helping students learn.

    LCD-7 — Featured
    Spark the Reading-Writing Connection (Grades K-2) (Repeat)

    Maria Walther, Grade 1 Teacher, Gwendolyn Brooks Elementary School, Aurora, IL
    Are you struggling to fit everything in your busy teaching day? Join Maria as she shares her latest classroom-tested ideas for streamlining literacy instruction and teaching with more depth. Learn how to integrate standards-focused big ideas during your reading and writing workshops. You will leave this session with a wealth of picture book titles, lessons, and practical strategies to use in your primary-grade classroom.

    LCD-8
    Powering Student Learning Through Teacher Conversations

    Debra Lewis Hogate, Trainer, Maine Partnership in Comprehensive Literacy, University of Maine, ME
    In this presentation participants will explore the power of teacher language in helping students confirm or reconsider the strategic processing decisions they make during reading and writing of continuous text. Emphasis will include the role of coaching conversations that facilitate strong teacher decision making that promote optimal student literacy learning outcomes.

    LCD-9
    Implementing Literacy Collaborative, Fostering Partnerships, and 21st Century Demands: Collaboration that Works! (Grades K-2)

    Shannon Carlson, Literacy Coach/Reading Specialist, Dennis-Yarmouth Regional School District, MA
    Kim Keith, Library Media Specialist, Dennis-Yarmouth Regional School District, MA
    Adrian Bogle, Grade 2 Classroom Teacher, Dennis-Yarmouth Regional School District, MA
    Carole Depin, Reading Recovery & Consulting Teacher of Reading, Dennis-Yarmouth Regional School District, MA

    As a Literacy Collaborative school, Marguerite E. Small Elementary is focused on collaborative efforts to empower our students and engage them in their learning in and out of our classrooms. By utilizing technology, literacy instruction is being reimagined to best support the rapidly changing needs of students. In this 90-minute session, we will introduce ways that The Literacy Leadership Team, educators, and school community members have collaborated to extend our school and community partnerships and continue to teach authentic and meaningful literacy experiences. Specific examples from units of study shared in first and second grade classrooms, literacy backpacks, collaborative lessons in library and technology lab, Read Across America week, volunteers, and Author’s tea will all be presented during the session. You will explore strategies for collaboration in your own schools and deepen understandings of integrating technology for classroom and school-based literacy instruction.

    LCD-10
    Responsible Use of Data: A Principal’s Perspective (Grades K-5)

    Katie Charner-Laird, Principal, Cambridge Public Schools, MA
    As administrators, we have to analyze the systems level growth in achievement data. It is our duty to ensure that all children are making progress, all subgroups are making progress, and we have a way to notice warning signs early enough to make a difference. Assessment data is a key part of doing this work. However, we must understand what the data is able to tell us, as well as the limitations of the data. In this session, you will hear about one school leader’s journey with data driven decision making, spend some time digging deeply into one assessment tool (the benchmark assessment system), and finally making a plan to further your own learning about the specific assessments in your own school.

    LCD-11
    The Power of the Pre-Conference: Using Coaching Conversations Before the Teaching to Deepen Teacher Expertise (Grades K-6)

    Cindy Downend, Assistant Director, Primary Literacy Collaborative, Lesley University, MA
    Oftentimes coaches use pre-observation conversations with teachers to fact-find, only learning what the teacher is planning to do and a focus for the observation. Learn how to maximize teacher reflection during a pre-observation conference. You will look at how to use coaching conversations before observing a lesson to deepen teacher’s effective use of lesson planning and design clear, concise language for instruction.

    Required Text: The Fountas & Pinnell Literacy Continuum: A Tool for Assessment, Planning, and Teaching, PreK-8 (any edition, Heinemann).

    LCD-12
    Creating Interest and Motivation in Secondary Readers (Grades 5-8)

    Michelle Parker, ELA Teacher & Dept Head/Doctoral Student, Huffman ISD/University of Houston, TX
    By supplying a wide variety of texts across many genres, and by providing an expansive range of subject matter, we can create interest and motivate students to read. Activities presented will include book selfies, book talks, student-created book trailers, writing activities and read aloud suggestions.

    LCD-13 (CANCELLED)

    LCD-14
    Finding the Story in Your Data (Grades K-6)

    Heather Rodman, Primary Literacy Collaborative Trainer, Lesley University, MA
    Wendy Vaulton, Senior Researcher, Lesley University, MA

    What does it take for educators to look at an abundance of data and turn it into useful information? Educators will experience a process that will enable them to step back to uncover the story their data may be telling. In this session, you will practice noticing patterns and trends in data, while avoiding common pitfalls such as jumping to conclusions, blaming, and rushing into quick-fixes. The goal of this session is to help educators move beyond reflexive data reporting/response cycles and toward a more reflective process of inquiry and discovery.

    LCD-15
    Prioritizing Readers and Emotions: Affective Reading Assessments in the Intermediate Classroom (Grades 5-8)

    Justin M. Stygles, Grade 5 Teacher/Author, Maine School Administrative District #17, ME
    The classroom is a pressure cooker for data. Repeated and high-stakes assessments have become centerpieces that satiate an external desire for data. Consequential validity is disregarded, which represses the affect of the reader. Assessment is informative, but limited, when the reader's attitude or ability to self-evaluate is marginalized. This session will offer an array of insights, related to self-consciousness, that will help teachers obtain and discern “what's best for kids” from assessments.

    LCD-16
    Technology for ELLs: Multimodal Meaning-Making Apps (Grades PreK-8)

    Amanda Wager, Assistant Professor TESOL, Bilingual Education Department, Lesley University, MA
    Valerie Harlow Shinas, Associate Professor & Division Director, Language and Literacy, Lesley University, MA

    Focusing on technology with ELL students, this session guides participants through the use of free, multimodal content creation apps, such as Puppet Pals, Sock Puppets, and Educreations. We will share how these tools create opportunities for children to compose performance-based products using English and home languages, and further knowledge of how digital tools may increase language acquisition in meaningful ways.

    Required Materials: Please bring your own mobile device and download the above free apps prior to the session.

    LCD-17
    The Power of Shared Writing in the Intermediate Grades (Grades 3-5)

    Alison Zylstra, Literacy Instructional Coach, Bennington Rutland Supervisory Union, VT
    Kerry Crosby, Adjunct Faculty/Literacy Consultant, Lesley University/Heinemann, MA

    Shared writing is a valuable, yet under-utilized tool in the upper elementary and middle school grades. Learn how to use shared writing to demonstrate how to write narrative, informational and opinion pieces within the content areas. Through video and student writing samples, you will explore the power of shared writing to teach organization, idea development, language use, sentence structure and voice for different genres and purposes.

    Recommended Text: The Fountas & Pinnell Literacy Continuum: A Tool for Assessment, Planning, and Teaching, PreK-8 (any edition, Heinemann).

  • Reading Recovery Session D | 3:30 pm–5:00 pm

    RRD-1 — Featured
    Acquiring Visual Working Systems for Literacy: Supporting Change Over Time

    Mary Anne Doyle, Reading Recovery Trainer, University of Connecticut, CT
    This session explores the acquisition of proficient visual processing strategies by beginning readers. The discussion includes review of both relevant theory and related instructional procedures with Reading Recovery children.

    RRD-2 — Featured
    Reading Recovery and Expectations for Classroom Writing in First Grade (Repeat)

    Adria Klein, Reading Recovery Trainer, Saint Mary's College of California, CA
    The new standards set the expectation for students to write using evidence from literary and informational texts. In this session, we will explore links between writing in Reading Recovery and the first grade classroom.

    RRD-3
    Errors Are Our Friends! Learning to Self-Monitor in Reading and Writing

    Laurel Dickey, Reading Recovery Teacher Leader, Collaborative for Educational Services, MA
    Knowing an error has been made is the first step to accurate reading and writing. During this session, you will explore how to best create opportunities and scaffolding to support children in learning how to self-monitor in both reading and writing. Examples from student lessons will be used for analysis.

Tuesday, October 24, 2017

  • Session E | 8:30 am–10:00 am

    Keynote Session
    From Striving to Thriving Readers (Grades K-8)

    Stephanie Harvey, Stephanie Harvey Consulting, Denver, CO
    We need an intervention on interventions in education. Of late, we seem to have become addicted to interventions. Every time a child reads even slightly below benchmark, we call for yet another intervention. The research is clear – what most kids really need to get better at reading is to read extensively in text they can and want to read. Nothing correlates higher to reading achievement than reading volume. So we need to curate our classroom libraries to ensure that all kids have access to books they can and want to read. We need to book match relentlessly and build in plenty of time for kids to just plain read. The best intervention is a good book. This interactive keynote will share research about the need for extensive amounts of time for kids to read and interact with text they can and want to read. It will share practices and strategies for book matching and assuring equitable access to multiple texts in classroom libraries. You will have time to create their own textual lineage, a compendium of texts that have made a difference in their lives, to share with their kids so they can create their own. Student work samples will be shared and you will be encouraged to interact with each other throughout the keynote.

  • Reading Recovery Session E | 8:30 am–10:00 am

    RRE-1 — Featured
    Acquiring Visual Working Systems for Literacy: Supporting Change Over Time (Repeat)

    Mary Anne Doyle, Reading Recovery Trainer, University of Connecticut, CT
    This session explores the acquisition of proficient visual processing strategies by beginning readers. The discussion includes review of both relevant theory and related instructional procedures with Reading Recovery children.

    RRE-2 — Featured
    Maximizing Opportunity for Flexible Word Solving in Writing: Each Change in the Child's Control Calls for an Adjustment in What the Teacher Does

    Lori Taylor, Reading Recovery Trainer, University of Maine, ME
    We know from Literacy Lessons Designed for Individuals that Reading Recovery teachers must continually lift the performance level of the child, taking his peak performance level into more facets of word and sentence construction during the writing task. Explore ways to teach and call for strategic activity in solving words in writing while considering the strengths and learning history of each child.

    Required Text: Literacy Lessons Designed for Individuals, Second Edition (2016, Heinemann).
    Participants are also asked to bring the lesson records, including a writing book, for one student.

    RRE-3
    Pondering Prompting

    Anne Jordan, Reading Recovery Teacher Leader, Ridge View Community School, ME
    For students who have a slower processing speed or show characteristics of difficulty in their literacy learning, can re-thinking the scale of help and teacher prompting promote better success? This session will examine the language of prompting to promote systematic learning when it appears a student is or might be recommended for further action. Current topics in brain research and the presenter's training and use of the UALR Dyslexia Intervention Model will be incorporated into the session discussion.

    RRE-4
    Profile of a Successful Writer in Reading Recovery

    Elizabeth Mayhew, Reading Recovery Teacher Leader, Cambridge Public Schools, MA
    ‘Writing can contribute to building of almost every kind of inner control of literacy that is needed by the successful reader’ (Marie Clay). This session will explore the ‘common ground’ that reading and writing share in early literacy acquisition through a case study. The presenter will share examples of ‘Leo’s’ writing as the messages develop in complexity. Presenter will share the analysis of instructional decisions that enabled ‘Leo’ to develop and extend his strategic processing as a writer and the reciprocal gains to his reading. This session will draw from the following Marie Clay sources: Change Over Time in Children’s Literacy Development; By Different Paths to Common Outcomes; and Literacy Lessons Designed for Individuals (2016 edition).

    Recommended Materials: Writing samples from your students.

  • Session F | 10:30 am–12:00 pm

    LCF-1 — Featured
    "Who Says There's No Time to Write?" (Grades 3-6)

    Paula Bourque, Literacy Coach/Author, Stenhouse/ Augusta Schools, ME
    In this session, you will explore being a teacher of writing who is a writing teacher! As Don Graves so eloquently stated, “You can't ask someone to sing a duet with you until you know the tune yourself.” We will talk about the importance of ‘singing along’ with our student writers and practice setting "tiny goals" to help teachers be writers.

    LCF-2 — Featured
    The Interfacing of Literacy and Play: Choice Time Reflection Journals (Grades K-2)

    Renee Dinnerstein, Early Childhood Literacy Consultant, NY
    Fanny Roman, Kindergarten Teacher, New York City Department of Education, NY

    Teachers and administrators at a NYC public school embraced choice time. They observed their ELL population collaborating, creating, and exploring at their centers. Their challenge was to produce evidence of academic growth. The exciting answer to this conundrum was the introduction of Choice Time Reflection Journals. In this session, Fanny Roman, a kindergarten teacher, and Renee Dinnerstein, her literacy consultant, will share the exciting story of these journals.

    LCF-3 — Featured
    Conditions for Fostering Curiosity in an Inquiry Based Classroom (Grades K-8)

    Stephanie Harvey, Stephanie Harvey Consulting, Denver, CO
    Passion and wonder are contagious. As teachers we keep the wise words of E.B White in mind –“Always be on the lookout for the presence of wonder.” Inquiry based learning is not always about a project at the end. Inquiry based learning is about living in a way that kids’ questions matter. Curiosity is at the core. We don’t need to teach kids to be curious. They pop out of the womb brimming with curiosity. But we do need to fan the curiosity flame so that kids have more questions as they move through school rather than less. After all, the more we learn, the more we wonder. This interactive session will share a body of research and a group of conditions that lead to a curious classroom. It will include strategies that promote questioning and exploration. It will offer thoughts on how to build in time for kids to experiment, question, investigate and research answers to their queries. Kids’ work, teacher lessons and classroom video clips will be shared.

    LCF-4 — Featured
    Heart Maps: Helping Students Create and Craft Authentic Writing (Grades K-6) (Repeat)

    Georgia Heard, Author/Independent Consultant, FL
    If we want students to write well, we must provide opportunities to explore their passions and find significance in their writing. In this session, Georgia Heard will introduce her unique heart map method that will open your students’ hearts, help them discover their stories, and bring their passions to the page.

    LCF-5 — Featured
    Looking at Student Writing to Inform Next Teaching (Grades K-2)

    Martha Horn, Elementary Education Professor, Rhode Island College, RI
    Looking at student work is the way we can figure out what our students know and need to learn. It is necessary in order to know what to teach next. In this session you will look at student work together and develop a language for noticing, naming, and documenting what we see. You will then discuss ways of presenting new information to our students.

    LCF-6 — Featured
    Let Students Be Your Guide: Using Student Writing and Conversations To Decide What To Teach Readers Next (Grades 3-8)

    Gravity Goldberg, Author/Consultant, Corwin Literacy, NY
    It can feel like Pin the Tail on the Donkey when choosing what lessons to teach each day–hoping and wishing we are on target. Yes, there are so many books, resource guides, and websites to read, but that can be overwhelming and often misses the mark on what your students need. In this session Gravity will show you an easy to implement process for making the most of what students write and discuss about their thinking. Students are telling us what they need next–we just need some help knowing what to look and listen for. You will leave this session with a daily protocol they can follow as well as a clear list of "look and listen fors" when conferring with student readers. You can feel confident that your teaching is on target and your conferring decisions are well worth their time.

    LCF-7 — Featured
    Choice Reading: Tools for Building Content Knowledge (Grades K-2) (Repeat)

    Susan Kempton, Teacher/ Author/ Consultant, Wonder, Discover, Feel Educational Consulting, CO
    Children are naturally drawn to books that captivate them: sharks, dinosaurs, insects…anything in the natural world is a topic for fascination in the young child. Discover how twenty minutes of the day can deepen content knowledge, develop language, and strengthen reading comprehension. In this interactive session you will experience: how to enter into inquiry with children; open windows into their thinking and passion; inform next steps in instruction for concept and language development; and, the various, dynamic tools (e.g. movement, dramatization, song, video) used for building language and concepts for retention and understanding.

    LCF-8 — Featured
    Windows, Mirrors and an Extra Adjective (Grades K-8) (Repeat)

    Grace Lin, Author/Illustrator, MA
    When we talk about diverse books, we often talk about "windows and mirrors." But what does that mean? And why is it important? In this extended presentation of Grace's TEDx talk, Grace shares childhood anecdotes and her path to publication, including how she learned to embrace the “multicultural” adjective.

    LCF-9 — Featured
    Embracing the Messiness of Choice (Grades K-2)

    Kari Yates, Program Manager for Literacy/Author/Consultant, Moorhead Public Schools, ND
    Choice is messy: so many readers, so many texts. It can feel a bit crazy and chaotic. Yet, nothing engages readers more than real and meaningful choice. In this session we'll consider simple but powerful practices that raise engagement, lower stress, and make independent reading a more purposeful and joyful time of day for all. This is messy work, but inside that messiness is a whole lot of opportunity. Let's embrace it!

    LCF-10
    If We're Not Mindful, It's Not Education (Grades PreK-8)

    Mary Anne Buckley, Multi-age K/1 Teacher, Victor Central Schools, NY
    When teachers, students and the curriculum come together mindfully, transformative classrooms are created. In this interactive session, you will learn meditation techniques for both yourself and your students and how to introduce mindfulness into your classroom daily. Discover ways to integrate mindfulness into the curriculum through movements, reflection periods and deliberate literary choices. You will have time to create read aloud lists and anchor charts for peaceful, creative, and collaborative classrooms.

    LCF-11
    Social-Emotional Learning through Authentic Literacy and Play in Early Education (Grades PreK-K)

    Giordana Cote, PreK Teacher, Dennis-Yarmouth School District, MA
    Susannah Criser, Kindergarten Teacher, Dennis-Yarmouth School District, MA

    The Collaborative for Academic, Social, and Emotional Learning (2013) has outlined five social and emotional developmental competencies necessary for proficient social development. These are highly recognized and cited in the literature in respect to SEL. These competencies include; self-awareness, social awareness, self-management, relationship skills, and responsible decision-making. The competencies have an overlapping nature and the development of one relates to another. Early childhood classrooms should include social and emotional learning within the context of the academic and cognitive demands of the school day. A literacy-rich early education classroom can encompass multitudes of opportunities to embed social and emotional learning experiences while developing a young child's love of reading, writing, and play.

    LCF-12
    Setting The Scene for Green Screen (Grades PreK-8)

    Sue Cusack, Assistant Professor/Director of Makerspace, Lesley University, MA
    Megan Brady, 7th & 8th Grade Social Studies Teacher, Somerville Public Schools, MA
    Alison Bougas, 5th Grade ELA and Social Studies Teacher, Somerville Public Schools, MA
    Jacy Edelman, Project Coordinator, Makerspace, Lesley University, MA

    You do not need a big studio with lights and expensive cameras to bring a Hollywood set into your classroom. With some green fabric and an iPad, your students can find themselves in the heart of the Amazon Rainforest, on the rings of Saturn, or wherever their imagination can take them. From storyboarding to setting the scene to editing, we will walk you through the steps to bring green screen to life in your classroom.

    LCF-13
    Unscripted: Making Coaching Decisions in the Moment (Grades PreK-8)

    Jillian Fountain, Intermediate and Middle School Literacy Collaborative Faculty, Lesley University, MA
    When working with colleagues, coaches must make decisions in the moment. Responding to teachers flexibly and skillfully is essential to lift the level of understanding and promote agency. This session will allow for reflection on current decision-making during coaching sessions, as well as develop coaches' capacity to be deliberate and agile in their ongoing interactions with teachers.

    LCF-14
    Shoulder to Shoulder: How to Implement Systematic Literacy Instruction (Grades K-8)

    Drew Goeldner, Principal, Rosemount - Apple Valley - Eagan School District (ISD 196), MN
    Facilitating systematic literacy instruction is a complex process. Through the implementation at the primary, intermediate, and middle levels, Drew has developed key approaches that help support the process. You will gain an understanding of effective strategies to support implementation.

    LCF-15
    How Talk and Writing Support the New Science Standards (Grades K-2)

    Martha Heller-Winokur, Literacy Consultant/Educator/Author, Needham Public Schools, MA
    Jeff Winokur, Elementary Science Educator, Wheelock College, MA

    This session will focus on the role of discourse and writing in inquiry-based science, particularly the development of student scientific reasoning and conceptual understanding. Connections between literacy standards and science practices, as outlined in the Next Generation Science Standards, can be found across stages of the inquiry process as students plan investigations, document work in science notebooks, write about their thinking, and discuss and debate in small and large groups.

    LCF-16
    Sojourner’s Truth (Grades 5-8)

    Priscilla Kane Hellweg, Executive Artistic Director, Enchanted Circle Theater, MA
    This arts-integrated workshop provides a behind the scenes view into Sojourner’s Truth: “I will shake every place I go to” and instruction in how to use our book/cd creative teaching tool in the grades 5-8 classroom. Integrating theater arts and history with selected scenes from Sojourner’s Truth, you will explore techniques for working with primary source documents to investigate a period in history, with creative applications to integrate them into daily classroom activities.

    LCF-17
    Using Multi-Media to Teach Challenging Subject Matter in Middle School ELA (Grades 5-8)

    Larissa McAree, Grades 6-8 ELA Teacher, Windsor Southeast Supervisory Union, Hartland Elementary School, VT
    Middle school students inherently want to discuss difficult or challenging subject matter, but many teachers find it difficult to know how to approach these topics and foster a classroom environment that is respectful, meaningful, and challenges their students. By using a multi-media approach, you can learn how to engage their students with film, graphic novels, YouTube, and Socratic discussion methods. You will be able to bring back lesson plan ideas, as well as Socratic discussion materials.

    Required Materials: Please bring a laptop or tablet.

    LCF-18
    When Interests and Reading Levels Don’t Match: Scaffolding Lifelong Readers (Grades K-6)

    Tammy Mullligan, Staff Developer/Author, Teachers for Teachers, MA
    Clare Landrigan, Staff Developer/Author, Teachers for Teachers, MA

    Books are teachers’ tools to instruct, engage, and help students develop a reading identity. The way we organize texts and teach students to choose books influences dispositions and reading habits. How do we use levels as an instructional tool without inadvertently labeling or leveling students? Join us as we share ways to organize classroom libraries to support text complexity and to broaden students’ understanding of how readers choose books.

    LCF-19
    Read to the Animals (Grades PreK-8)

    Dyan Underhill, President, School Board, Minot Public School District #160, ND
    How can animals improve literacy? What does it take to engage a community? Many children need more practice reading aloud. Many shelter animals need socialization in order to find a forever home. After reading about a variety of animal reading programs around the United States, I took the initiative to reach out to the local animal shelter to leverage animals as a tool to ultimately improve student reading. Learn key ways to create an animal reading program that improves accuracy, speed, confidence, and literacy success. Explore innovative strategies that allow potential organizers to contact animal shelters and organizations, obtain sponsors, reach out to volunteers, and share stories with the community. Discover ways to promote reading with the humane treatment of animals. Leave with ideas for building a successful animal reading program within your community, school, or district.

  • Reading Recovery Session F | 10:30 am–12:00 pm

    Reading Recovery Keynote
    Learning to Take Risks and Taking Risks to Learn

    Julia Douetil, Retired Director, International Literacy Centre, University College London
    We talk of helping children in Reading Recovery to become risk takers, but why and how? What risks must we be prepared to take as teachers if we are to achieve the challenge that Marie Clay set, for every child who needs us, and are we ready to step up to the mark? This session explores the interplay of risk, resilience and self-efficacy in learning, from the perspectives of the learner and the teacher.

  • Session F In-Depth | 10:30 am–1:45 pm

    LCF-20 In-Depth
    Depth of Knowledge: Raising the Rigor in Literacy (Grades 3-6)

    Nancy Boyles, Independent Literacy Consultant, Southern Connecticut State University, CT
    How do we define rigor in literacy—and what does this have to do with Depth of Knowledge (DOK)? More importantly, what should DOK look like in literacy instruction and assessment, keeping new standards in mind? This interactive session will identify standards-based tasks for each DOK, how you can plan for maximum DOK impact, and what this new-era rigor will look like for both teachers and students.

  • Session G | 1:30 pm–3:00 pm

    LCG-1 — Featured
    Wait, Did You Say Editing Can Be FUN?! (Grades 3-6) (Repeat)

    Paula Bourque, Literacy Coach/ Author, Stenhouse/ Augusta Schools, ME
    Learn techniques for engaging writers to edit their work at multiple points in the writing process and not just at “The End”. The goal is for students to become ‘Close Writers’ and read their work for a variety of purposes and with a variety of lenses. Paula will share video and samples from classrooms where students engage in close writing editing strategies. She will also share why editing is often hard for our students and how we can overcome some of those challenges together.

    LCG-2 — Featured
    The Zen of Guided Play: Planning, Observing, Reflecting and Taking the Next Steps to Support the Deep Learning That Takes Place During Inquiry and Play (Grades PreK-2)

    Renee Dinnerstein, Early Childhood Literacy Consultant, NY
    View photos and videos of children at choice time centers, using a prepared template to write observations and, in partnerships reflect on what stood out and then plan next steps for supporting the work that is being done in the center. With the support of the presenter, you will also use a prepared template to plan a center that would be appropriate for their own classroom.

    LCG-3 — Featured
    Let Students Be Your Guide: Using Student Writing and Conversations To Decide What To Teach Readers Next (Grades 3-8) (Repeat)

    Gravity Goldberg, Author/Consultant, Corwin Literacy, NY
    It can feel like Pin the Tail on the Donkey when choosing what lessons to teach each day–hoping and wishing we are on target. Yes, there are so many books, resource guides, and websites to read, but that can be overwhelming and often misses the mark on what your students need. In this session Gravity will show you an easy to implement process for making the most of what students write and discuss about their thinking. Students are telling us what they need next–we just need some help knowing what to look and listen for. You will leave this session with a daily protocol they can follow as well as a clear list of "look and listen fors" when conferring with student readers. You can feel confident that your teaching is on target and your conferring decisions are well worth their time.

    LCG-4 — Featured
    Understanding Writing Conferences (Grades K-2) (Repeat)

    Martha Horn, Elementary Education Professor, Rhode Island College, RI
    This session will look at what makes conferring challenging. Why do some conferences seem effective and others, not? Specifically, we will examine the instructional moves of thinking on your feet, drawing the story out, connecting with writers to help them move forward, and considering our language—what helps and what might hinder.

    LCG-5 — Featured
    Conditions for Fostering Curiosity in an Inquiry Based Classroom (Grades K-8) (Repeat)

    Stephanie Harvey, Stephanie Harvey Consulting, Denver, CO
    Passion and wonder are contagious. As teachers we keep the wise words of E.B White in mind –“Always be on the lookout for the presence of wonder.” Inquiry based learning is not always about a project at the end. Inquiry based learning is about living in a way that kids’ questions matter. Curiosity is at the core. We don’t need to teach kids to be curious. They pop out of the womb brimming with curiosity. But we do need to fan the curiosity flame so that kids have more questions as they move through school rather than less. After all, the more we learn, the more we wonder. This interactive session will share a body of research and a group of conditions that lead to a curious classroom. It will include strategies that promote questioning and exploration. It will offer thoughts on how to build in time for kids to experiment, question, investigate and research answers to their queries. Kids’ work, teacher lessons and classroom video clips will be shared.

    LCG-6 — Featured
    Reader-Centered Instruction: What's Your Next Move? (Grades K-2)

    Kari Yates, Program Manager for Literacy/Author/Consultant, Moorhead Public Schools, ND
    We must continue working to provide our students with the books, time, choice and responsive teaching they deserve. But reader-centered instruction doesn't happen all at once. It happens one thoughtful and courageous next-step at a time. Day by day, student by student, move by move, we can step closer to the classrooms we've imagined. This session will remind and encourage you to do just that. You'll leave with the energy, the commitment, and the courage to make your next move a move that matters.

    LCG-7
    How Language is Learned: Your ELL Students (Grades PreK-8)

    Dr. Martha S. Burns, Joint Appointment Professor, Northwestern University, IL
    Second language learners have twice the work of their English-speaking peers since they must acquire a new language while learning the same content as the other students. The new science of learning helps educators understand the research behind how the brain learns and why some students struggle with language acquisition and reading. Join us to learn about the skills needed to build a learning foundation and to accelerate success for ELL students.

    LCG-8
    Children’s Literature as a Window into Science (Grades 3-6)

    Mary M. Cerullo, Author/Educator, Friends of Casco Bay, ME
    Science is a story–a story of discovery. Who can resist reading about how scientists finally tracked down a living giant squid, how dolphins form forever family bonds, or a sunken ship becomes a refuge for marine animals. Children’s nonfiction literature enriches the science curriculum by illustrating the challenges and excitement of doing science. You will try out exercises that help students interpret nonfiction literature.

    LCG-9
    From Open House to Open Dialogue: Reimagining Family Literacy Engagement (Grades K-2)

    Jennifer Chafin, Grade 1 Teacher, Oxford Hills School District, ME
    Jessika Sheldrick, Literacy Coach, Oxford Hills School District, ME

    Conversations about literacy achievement can be intimidating for both teachers and parents. Do you wonder if traditional parent-teacher conferences and family nights are enough to have an impact on students’ literacy success? This session illuminates new ways to strengthen and sustain authentic family engagement. Come discover ways to reimagine inclusive school environments that cultivate honest conversation through the social, emotional, and socio-economic aspects of our culture.

    LCG-10
    Anchoring STEM Interdisciplinary Teaching With Engaging Novels (Grades 5-8)

    Colleen Clabault, Grade 8 English Teacher, Sandwich STEM Academy, MA
    Betty Hyde-McGuire Grade 8 Science Teacher, Sandwich STEM Academy, MA

    As STEM education is pushed to the forefront in our schools, learn ways to use novels as the catalyst for inquiry-based instruction across all disciplines. We will share our interdisciplinary project based on the anchor text, The Great Trouble by Deborah Hopkinson, demonstrating how literacy, scientific and historical thinking skills are integrated in our classrooms. Then we’ll explore other books and show how to develop strong driving questions applicable to all disciplines.

    LCG-11
    Let Your Students Find Their Voice through Oratory Integration (Grades 5-8)

    Barbara Connery, Instructional Coach, Regional School District 6, CT
    By studying and performing important historical speeches written by accomplished American orators such as Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass, you will learn how to strengthen their students’ writing, speaking, and leadership skills. Additionally, you will learn how to harness the power of your students’ unique voices and put into words the issues that matter most to them. Using the tools and videos provided by Ford’s Theatre, oratory integration will become a classroom favorite!

    LCG-12
    Awesome Apps for Early Literacy: Leveling the Playing Field (Grades K-2)

    Libby Curran, Literacy Interventionist, Martin Luther King Charter School, NH
    In this session, Libby will present a framework for selecting and evaluating early literacy apps based on design elements and digital features aligned with evidence-based emergent literacy instruction. You will see demonstrations of innovative and effective reading and writing iPad apps to engage young learners, improve vocabulary, comprehension and problem solving while building foundational reading skills. This interactive session will include discussion and hands-on exploration of early literacy apps that promote learning, engagement and depth of knowledge.

    LCG-13
    Supporting Growth Mindsets and Dynamic Learning Frameworks with Children’s Literature (Grades K-2)

    Grace Enriquez, Associate Professor of Language and Literacy, Lesley University, MA
    Jessica Della Calce, Early Literacy Interventionist, Cambridge Public Schools, MA
    Summer R. Clark, Associate Professor of Literacy Education, Lesley University, MA

    This session focuses on the use of children’s literature to support growth mindset and dynamic learning frame development in classroom literacy instruction. Based on our research in a diverse urban public elementary school, we will share ways of identifying children’s literature that supports such development and strategies for incorporating them into daily literacy instruction.

    LCG-14
    Using Facilitative Talk to Deepen Teacher Engagement in Professional Learning (Grades K-8) (Repeat)

    Toni Czekanski, Asst. Dir. Grants, Contracts, and Special Projects, Lesley University, MA
    Helen Sisk, Intermediate and Middle School Literacy Collaborative Faculty, Lesley University, MA

    How do you ensure that educators get the most out of professional learning experiences? Whether it is one-to-one conversations, small group discussions, or whole-group reflection, we want professional learning to pack a punch. The structure of learning opportunities and the way teachers are engaged extends thinking and builds agency and ownership. In this workshop, you will learn what makes professional development effective, how to notice and reflect upon the group’s engagement, and ways to deepen their thinking. This facilitation develops a culture of inquiry and learning and models a reflective process that teachers can use on their own.

    LCG-15
    Everybody Reading, Every Day: Creating a School-wide Culture of Literacy (Grades PreK-8)

    Liz Garden, Principal, Groton-Dunstable/Florence Roche Elementary, MA
    Hear how a culture shift was accomplished in one elementary school to create a school-wide culture of literacy. You will leave with lots of ideas and examples of ways to get everyone in the building reading and talking about books!

    LCG-16
    Introduction to Poetry Workshop (Grades 3-6)

    Seema Sgobbo, Intermediate and Middle School Literacy Collaborative Faculty, Lesley University, MA
    This is an introductory workshop designed to help you think through poetry in the intermediate grades. You will explore the phases of poetry workshop and the integration of reading/writing and oral language along the way! You will be immersed in experiences and will begin to create their own poetry anthologies.

    LCG-17
    Raising Reading and Writing Levels in a School Deemed Underperforming (Grades PreK-8)

    Amy Seldin, Reading Interventionist, Springfield Public Schools, MA
    Ruth Tate, Reading Interventionist, Springfield Public Schools, MA
    Tara Christian Clark, Principal, Springfield Public Schools, MA

    In this session, teachers and administrators of an urban, K-8 public school will describe the process of raising students’ reading and writing levels from underperforming into an academically rigorous community of readers and writers in an award-winning school. We will present the multifaceted, whole school plan including professional development, tiered instruction, reading intervention, and Collaborative Team Meetings. The result was a dramatic rise in the levels of reading and writing performance over a 3-year period.

  • Reading Recovery Session G | 1:30 pm–3:00 pm

    RRG-1 — Featured
    Maximizing Opportunity for Flexible Word Solving in Writing: Each Change in the Child's Control Calls for an Adjustment in What the Teacher Does (Repeat)

    Lori Taylor, Reading Recovery Trainer, University of Maine, ME
    We know from Literacy Lessons Designed for Individuals that Reading Recovery teachers must continually lift the performance level of the child, taking his peak performance level into more facets of word and sentence construction during the writing task. Explore ways to teach and call for strategic activity in solving words in writing while considering the strengths and learning history of each child.

    Required Text: Literacy Lessons Designed for Individuals, Second Edition (2016, Heinemann).
    Participants are also asked to bring the lesson records, including a writing book, for one student.

    RRG-2
    Using Predictions of Progress to Attain Maximum Growth for Each Child

    Carolynne Beless, Reading Recovery Teacher Leader, Dennis-Yarmouth School District, MA
    This session will focus on writing and updating your student's Predictions of Progress, making them effective and useful working documents to guide your daily practice. Clay tells us..."Predict the paths of progress for each child, describing the changes you want to see." (LLDI, 2016) This will be a workshop style session. We will work together using Literacy Lessons Designed for Individuals, student data and video clips to create productive Predictions of Progress.

    Required Text: Literacy Lessons Designed for Individuals, Second Edition (2016, Heinemann).

    RRG-3
    Young Constructive Readers and Writers (Grades K-2)

    Kelly L. McDermott, Reading Recovery Teacher Leader, Boston Public Schools, MA
    In Reading Recovery lessons we must teach students to problem-solve. Clay tells us that, young constructive readers and writers work at problem-solving sentences and messages. In this session you will analyze examples from video, lesson records and running records, dig into Literacy Lessons Designed for Individuals (2016 edition) and think about planning and reflecting in a deliberate manner to ensure you are teaching students to choose between alternatives, attend to several different kinds of knowledge, search, select, reject, self-monitor and self-correct. You will spend time thinking about how essential it is that students are becoming increasingly entranced by working out problems throughout their series of Reading Recovery lessons.

Workshop Schedule
Questions
If you have any questions, please contact the Literacy for All Conference team